I’m a post-doctoral research scientist at the Climate Change Research Centre at UNSW, in Sydney, Australia. I am mostly interested in how phenomena on large scale end of atmospheric dynamics – such as the MJO and the Hadley Circulation – interact with the climate. One current project is an attempt to identify and understand how the boundaries of the tropical region have moved in the recent decades and may continue to move in the near future as the climate changes.

I recently completed my graduate studies at Harvard, associated with Physics and Atmospheric Sciences. I was working with Zhiming Kuang and group on tropical atmospheric dynamics – convection and convectively coupled atmospheric waves and the Madden-Julian Oscillation. I am still continuing this line of research – currently preparing to publish another paper based upon the work done during my PhD.

 

I’ve had a varied research career. I have worked on Gravitational wave detection, nonlinear optics, Ultra-cold quantum gasses, vibrational segregation of granular matter, using confocal microscopy to assay the RNA complement of viruses, optical methods to explore the signal transmission involved in chemotaxis (movement stimulated by the environment) in E.coli.

I have shown five year olds how to suck water through a straw quicker than their teachers and “tamed” three million volt lightning generated by a Tesla Coil. I have also taught Newtonian mechanics to premed students and poured liquid nitrogen down the front of my body!

Since 2005 I have worked in Atmospheric physics, primarily studying the problem of representation of convection with in models of the global atmosphere. This problem stems from the fact that the atmosphere is very wide and relatively slow, whereas convection is very fast and occurs on very small scales making it computationally impractical to simulate both the large scale atmosphere and convection in detail together.

Research Interests: Convectively coupled atmospheric waves, the Madden Julian Oscillation, Climate, and science communication.